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(E)mailing it In

6022279419 7517b6bf4a o (E)mailing it In

This is a post by PR Columnist by Alison Kenney.

Lately I’ve noticed more and more reporters skipping the interview and “writing” their articles based on email interviews.

For a case in point, take this recent HARO query:

“Emails only, please, no phone calls. And please don’t email to arrange a separate interview, I’m just looking to hear some comments from all y’all. Thanks guys.”

While there have always been reporters willing to run with the verbiage PR pros give them – such as lifting a quote from a press release when covering breaking news – now, however, the practice is being used more often and not just for breaking news stories, but more frequently in feature articles.

A couple of well-regarded blogs have commented on this practice recently, although mostly from the perspective of the media.

American Journalism Review wrote about the practice from the journalists’ and editors’ point of view (which is well worth a read). The post expresses concern that email interviews “promote lazy reporting and the use of unreliable sources…”

PR Daily recently asked, “Is the phone interview dead?” and lamented the lack of color an email interview has in comparison with a phone interview, as well as the lack of natural “back and forth that comes from a conversation. Plus, there’s no personal relationship building, however slight, when everything is done in written form.”

In response to the PR Daily post, Clay Ziegler did his own experiment and called a dozen working journalists to quiz them about their interview method preferences. He concluded that the phone interview lives and why that’s a good thing.

Like most changes wrought by new technology (and social media, in particular), old practices may not go away, but new practices – including using IM, Twitter, Facebook and email to get information and quotes for a story – are becoming more and more accepted.

What can PR pros expect as email interviews become accepted practice?

Get with the program – if you need media coverage to communicate your, or your client’s, story, get used to the new way of doing things and accept that some reporters prefer to work this way.

Be prepared – don’t stop at the point of pitching a story; think it through; have your point of view fully vetted and your quote ready.

Enjoy having more control – the good news about email interviews is that there is less chance of being misquoted or of having a reporter pick up on the one throwaway line in an otherwise stellar phone interview.

Use email interviews to bridge distances – if a client is traveling in another time zone and phone interviews aren’t convenient, email interviews can save the day.

Realize that no one speaks like PR quotes in real life – if you email in a corporate-approved quote, and the reporter fails to use good segues or connectors, the result will be a string of presser quotes that fail to add real perspective.

Keep an eye on which outlets use email interviews judiciously and properly – sloppy use of email interviews, in which its clear the writer used email for speed and convenience above all else, can devalue the quality of the media outlet’s content, thereby decreasing the value of your placement.

What do you think? Have you experienced many email interviews lately?

Alison Kenney an independent PR practitioner with more than 15 years of PR consulting experience. She is based on Boston’s North Shore and has worked with organizations in the technology, professional services and consumer industries. She writes a bi-monthly PR column on LindsayOlson.com. You can find her at www.kprcommunications.com. Learn more about Alison Kenney.

 

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3 Comments - Add yours!

Please Send Email Only, No Phone Calls Please… | The PRagmatist (June 5th, 2012)

[...] both assure better quality information and less bias? There is an argument to be made for that, as stated by Alison Kenney who blogs for PR recruiter Lindsay Olson of Paradigm Staffing: A couple of well-regarded blogs have [...]

ASI The Blog » (E)mailing it In (June 25th, 2012)

[...] read the full article, click here Tags: email, email interview, emailing, interview, lindsay olson, phone interview, public [...]

Jenna (August 7th, 2012)

I majored in journalism in college and, though my professors told me phone interviews were always better, I always opted for e-mail interviews. I am a terrible note taker, and I really liked that I could just copy and paste someone’s exact response. Not to mention, most people are sitting with their inboxes open all day at work, and it can be easier to shoot a quick e-mail than take a phone call sometimes.

However, it is true that people tend to craft their words differently in an e-mail, which can sometimes skew the truth. They can also be very long winded. There are pros and cons, however, I think it is an acceptable form of interviewing if done properly.

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